Not counting the line-item vetoes made to parts of the appropriations measures for the current year, there were four bills that were vetoed by Governor Mike Parson.

Among these is House Bill 685.

Senator Justin Brown of Rolla handled this proposal in the upper chamber. When this bill was discussed on the floor of the Missouri Senate on May 4, he told his colleagues this measure would make changes to rules relating to the duties and qualifications of certain public officers…

“It’s a dissolution of candidate committees that deals with, under current law any person who registered as a lobbyist required to dissolve his or her candidate committee, this act creates an exemption per where this require a person holding an elected municipal office or school district office, or any person that is a candidate for an elected municipal office in that school district, this prevision is identical to senate bill 602…”

During discussion, Senator Jill Schupp of Creve Coeur focused on the main part of the proposal, which dealt with campaign committees for certain candidates…

“They can continue to lobby even though they hold positions in their local community…”

In his veto letter, the governor says — and, these are his words — “[p]ublic officers should have the interests of the people they represent in mind, not those of the organization they have been hired to represent”…

Lawmakers will have the opportunity to override any and all vetoes during the annual veto session, which is scheduled for the middle of this month. By law, a veto override needs a two-thirds’ majority in each chamber.

House Bill 661 is another proposal to receive a veto this year.

During discussion on the floor of the Missouri Senate on May 11, Sen. Lincoln Hough of Springfield told his colleagues this bill related to transportation…

“Currently, when someone wants to get access to the Patrol crash records…they must also pay the fee associated with the Sunshine Law, this bill adds that the Patrol may charge a $5 electronic distribution fee for that report.”

A number of amendments were offered, including one from Sen. Angela Walton Moseley of Florissant…

“A historic motor vehicle may be operated for personal use, as described in the statute, more than 1,000 miles. This act repeals the limitations. It was voted out the transportation committee unanimously.”

In his veto letter for House Bill 661, the governor cites several reasons, including a portion that would have expanded powers for the Joint Committee on Transportation.

In addition, this measure would have made changes to certain things MoDOT could do.

Also, three St. Louis-area counties would have been excluded from the federal Clean Air Act.

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